http://www.thecityreview.com/home.html

Sotheby's Tribal Arts auctions previews and recaps

The City Review does nice previews and recaps of the Sotheby's Tribal Arts
auctions each year. Below is a list of the archived articles and below the archives
are my favorite picks from the November 11, 2005 auction.
SOTHEBY'S AFRICAN & OCEANIC ART
SALE N08132  

AUCTION DATE
SESSION 1 | 11 Nov 05, 10:15 AM.
SESSION 2 | 11 Nov 05, 02:00 PM.

LOCATION
New York

To view the entire catalog online on the Sotheby's site -
CLICK HERE (it will open in a new window)

I look forward to the arrival of the Sotheby's auction catalogs now like I used to get excited about the new holiday catalog from
Sears when I was a kid! I used to make a wish list in the Sears catalogs and now I make wish lists in the Sotheby's catalogs.

There were many beautiful objects in the catalog this time and below are some of my favorite picks from the auction.

I LOVE the Lengola figure and I'd say it is on the top of my wish list. I've become infatuated with the objects from the region that
the Lengola come from in the D.R.C. (formerly Zaire).

The Tatanua mask is a wonderful example, I love these masks and would love to own one someday.

The Mende figure with the snake to the mouth was quite unusual and beautiful.

The Senufo helmet mask and equestrian figure are both very nice.

I loved the Yoruba Epa mask with the horse and all of the figures on it.

The Mambila figure is very unusual and I like that about it. I really like the outstretched arms similar to the Lengola.

The terracotta male figure from Cameroon is beautiful, it just has an overall great presence to it.

The Lega and Lwalwa figures are wonderful in their abstract forms.

A lot of the objects in this sale are from the Britt Family Collection and there is a write up in the catalog and I have included it at
the bottom of the page. I especially loved the statement made below by Raymond Britt, I can relate with his statement, isn't that
what collecting is all about!

"THE OBJECTS WHICH I COLLECTED ARE THOSE I ENCOUNTERED IN THE COURSE OF MY SEARCH TO WHICH I FELT A
PERSONAL RESPONSE."

(THE REV.) RAYMOND E. BRITT, JR.
LOT 26

PROPERTY FROM A WEST COAST PRIVATE COLLECTION
A NEW IRELAND, MALANGAAN, MASK

Estimate 8,000—12,000 USD
MEASUREMENTS
height 18 1/2 inches 47cm

DESCRIPTION
of helmet-shaped form, the wooden face mask with open mouth and inset shell eyes (turbo
petholatus) beneath the tall multi-tiered and crested headdress composed of fiber and cloth;
aged surface with areas of lime and white, red and black pigment.
LOT 31

PROPERTY FROM A BELGIAN PRIVATE COLLECTION
A RARE SIERRA LEONE, PROBABLY MENDE, FIGURE
AFRICA

estimate 25,000—35,000 USD

MEASUREMENTS
height 34 in. 86cm

DESCRIPTION
of large proportions, the articulated feet and parted legs supporting the torso in a European military tunic and encircled by a
snake held to the mouth beneath the ridged neck and the head with typical full features and upturned eyes and wearing a
crown; aged blackened surface layered over green pigment.

PROVENANCE
British Colonial Collection

CATALOGUE NOTE
Stylistically this figure shares characteristics with traditional figurative sculpture from the Sierra Leone region, particularly Mende
and Temne. The bold stance, full hips, ridged neck, compressed face and uniformly blackened surface situate the figure.

See Gottschalk (2005: 130-135) for a comprehensive overview of the current scholarship on Mende and related works of art:
See (ibid. :136-157) for related figures most commonly known for use in the context of initiation within the Sande society, placed
in personal altars they also have therapeutic or protective functions.

The offered figure, wearing a military tunic and royal crown, has obvious elements of European influence. Incorporation of
European elements into African iconography dates back to the earliest contact, and is evident in Benin works of art from the
15th century, for example.

In addition to the European elements, the snake and the crown are distinct symbols seen in other Mende works of art. When the
English came to Sierra Leone in 1885 to declare it a Protectorate, and subsequently bring its colonial rule to an end, Queen
Victoria's Paramount Chiefs were given replicas of her crown to acknowledge Britain's presence. These crowns became symbols
of independence and were considered, for a long time, prestige objects of the highest rank (Gottschalk 1990: 138).

In Mende works of art the meaning of combs, cowrie shells, antelope horns and birds are multivalent. Snakes, however, are a
direct symbol of fertility (Gottschalk 2005: 133).

According to Gottschalk (2005: 133-34), there is a type of carving known in Mende culture as an 'idle thing' --without purpose
other than prestige. It was not unusual for such statues to be used for one’s personal altar or as a prestige object. By 1931 and
up until about 1960, leading English colonial officials encouraged the exhibition of these carvings in their meetings with the
Paramount-Chiefs to lend the event a special tone. The best work was awarded with prize money given to the carver.

The offered figure falls most likely into the latter category of an 'idle thing'. Its marriage of traditional Mende and new European
symbols suggest that it was created by a traditional carver both for his own prestige in order to make money by his artistry, and
prestige of the one who commissioned and later owned the work.
LOT 60

PROPERTY FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION
A RARE SENUFO HELMET MASK

estimate 50,000—70,000 USD

MEASUREMENTS
height 15 3/4 in. 40 cm

DESCRIPTION
kponiugo, the helmet of hollowed form and complex composition, with a transverse sagittal crest, composed with two animal snouts
projecting to either side, each with squared hollowed mouth, raised linear nose, and incised circular eyes, one flanked by a pair of
raised lanceolate ears, and the other by asymmetrical kpelie masks, and supporting two female figures above, carved from the same
piece of wood, each with shortened legs, a distinct helmet-shaped head with coiffure rising to a crest, and forward-protruding mouth
baring teeth, and framed by a pair of horns with indigenous restoration, the whole encircled by a band with pendant magical
elements; fine and varied deep black patina.

PROVENANCE
René Rasmusseum Collection
Acquired from the above by Dr. F. Kerbourc'h, 1970
Andre Schoeller, Paris, 1994
Private Collection, Paris

LITERATURE AND REFERENCES
Galerie Alain de Monbrison, Collection Kerbourc'h: 1993:48, catalogue of the exhibition, Paris, at Galerie Alain de Monbrison, 24
November, 1993- 4 January, 1994

The National Museum of History, Visions d'Afrique, (catalogue number 131) catalogue of the exhibition, Taipei, The National Museum
of History, 19 December, 2003- 20 February, 2004



CATALOGUE NOTE
Kponiugo helmet masks are exceptionally rare. The zoomorphic helmets can depict elements of a number of animals at the same
time. The offered lot shows the head of a hyena being eaten by a crocodile, and yet surmouted by the horns of an antelope-- all
important symbolic animals for the Senufo. The mask played a protective role, associated with death and the power of the secret
Poro society. The kponiugo would have been paired with the female kpelie mask within a masquerade depicting the complementarity
of the sexes.

Compare the complex nature of the iconography on the offered lot with two others published by Goldwater in 1964--illustration 72
and 73. Item 72 from the collection of The American Museum of National History, depicts the same shape of helmet, with distinct
kpelie, but they are alternated with raised firespitter masks. Item 73 from the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, may be by
the same carver or atelier as the offered lot-- the janiform helmet with two animal snouts, a pair of lanceolate ears, and a kpelie
mask, but in this case one of the female figures and the antelope horns are missing.

The iconography of the offered lot is exceptional, an accumulation of references including miniature kpelie masks, two female figures
of divination, and a band laden with magical elements including duiker horns and pieces of metal.
LOT 61

PROPERTY FROM AN AMERICAN PRIVATE COLLECTION
A FINE AND RARE SENUFO EQUESTRIAN FIGURE

estimate 20,000—30,000 USD

MEASUREMENTS
height 13in. 33cm

DESCRIPTION
the diminutive horse surmounted by the large rider with elongated torso, the finely articulated hands holding the horse's ear, and the right
hand holding a curved blade with indigenous repair at the wrist, the head with a sloped facial plane, pursed lips and large downcast eyes and
wearing a broad helmet with a nobbed finial; aged and varied deep brown patina.

PROVENANCE
Harry A. Franklin Family Collection, Beverly Hills
Sotheby's New York, April 21, 1990, lot 46

EXHIBITED
Hanover, New Hampshire, The Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Curator's Choice, January 2 - March 10, 1991

LITERATURE AND REFERENCES
Cole, Riders of Power in African Sculpture, 1983: number 40, catalogue of the exhibition, Los Angeles, The Los Angeles County Museum of
Art, November 23, 1983 - May 6, 1984.

CATALOGUE NOTE
This equestrian figure is incredibly refined in carving style and sophistication of concept marrying traditional accoutrements of prestige into
an equestrian composition. The carver exhibits a wonderful play of scale and proportions in this figure.


The rider wears a broad Sudanic helmet that identifies him as a champion cultivator, sambali, 'a title given to those whose strength,
perseverence and willingness to endure pain...have earned them the most prestigious honor a man can achieve'. See Barbier, ed. (1993: 26)
for a closely related figure, collected before 1939, wearing this type of hat which was made by the farmers themselves.

The Senufo 'associate horses with leadership, wealth, status, hunting and militarism. Riders sculpted by Senufo artists are often armed with
spears at the ready. They represent the multi-dimensional powers of madabele (forest or 'bush' spirits). In equestrian statuary a bush spirit is
shown as a forceful, well-armed leader, or fanhafolo ('power-owner'). Bush spirits are capricious, fast-traveling, nocturnal, mysterious and
aggressive.. . .Such figures are display pieces in a diviner's or priest's shrine where. . . they connote luxury, good taste and prestige' (Cole
1983: 11-13).

The Franklin figure sends a message of 'double' power in its representation of an equestrian bush spirit clearly imbued with the additional
power and skill of a master cultivator.
LOT 74

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF MARIDA HINES BRINKWORTH
A SUPERB YORUBA EPA HELMET MASK BY BAMGBOYE OF ODO OWO (CA. 1895 - 1978)

estimate 40,000—60,000 USD

MEASUREMENTS
height 41 3/4 in. 106cm

DESCRIPTION
the janiform helmet pierced at the mouth with large hemispherical eyes and square ears to either side supporting an elaborate
superstructure of the warrior-king astride a horse, holding a spear in his right hand and scepter with a bound captive in the
left, and wearing a tall, crested hat with a pendant flange at the reverse touching the high-backed saddle and surrounded at
the base by four diminutive musicians, each figure with stern features including tightly closed mouths, broad aquiline noses
and large, prominently outlined almond-shaped eyes; the whole elaborately decorated with red, white, black and blue pigment.

PROVENANCE
Collected circa 1956 by Ian Brinkworth, MBE, District Officer, Nigeria (1946-1957) directly from the artist, Bamgboye at his
atelier in Odo Owo
By descent to the present owner

CATALOGUE NOTE
William Ian Brinkworth (1914-2000) was born in India to British parents. After his schooling, Brinkworth trained to be a painter
at the Slade School of Fine Art, London. With the advent of World War II, Brinkworth joined the military, earning several
medals and an MBE (Member of the British Empire).

After the war, Brinkworth joined the British Colonial Administrative Service in Nigeria, and over the next 11 years was promoted
to District Office and finally to Senior District Officer. During his tenure, Brinkworth took great interest in the local cultures and
travelled extensively. He used a specially adapted camping van which allowed him to photograph and document his
experiences. Brinkworth developed a good rapport with many local chiefs and collected works of art. In 1956, his penultimate
year in Nigeria, Brinkworth acquired what he rightly considered to be ‘the jewel’ of his collection —the offered mask. He
purchased the piece directly from the master-carver, Bamgboye, and he documented his encounter with the artist at his
workshop in Odo Owo, in the Ekiti region.

Upon his return to England, Brinkworth pursued media and lecturing interests before turning to writing. Under the nom de
plume Ian Brook, Brinkworth wrote five novels, two critically-acclaimed of which, Jimmy Riddle (1961) and his autobiography,
The One-Eyed Man is King (1966), are based in Africa. Brinkworth also wrote numerous essays about African Art, published
by The Geographical Magazine and West African Review, amongst others, under the name Ian Brinkworth.

The Brinkworth mask is closely related to another well-known Epa mask by Bamgboye now in the collection of the Detroit
Institute of Arts. See Kan (1995: 78, number 27) for the Detroit Epa and discussion. The Detroit mask is thought to date from
the 1930's. Similarly, Brinkworth recorded that Bamgboye, at the time in his 60's, recounted that he had created the mask as a
young man. Based on this account, the Brinkworth mask was most likely carved in the 1930’s.

The Brinkworth and the Detroit masks demonstrate the best of Bamgboye's talents in creating a complex composition with a
sense of controlled tension. This celebrated carver had orikis, or praise poems, composed to honor his virtuosity as one
whose work 'reveals a discipline of mind and hand, ifarabale' (Pemberton 1994: 133). John Pemberton documented an oriki
composed for Bamboye, which concludes:

The elephant has fled in the face of the hunter.
The mighty one has fallen in the forest and can no longer rise.
The elephant has fallen; the elephant is gone.
The elephant has fallen; the elephant is gone.
Ajanaku the mighty one has fallen and can no longer rise.
Ajanaku has fallen and cannot climb the mountain.
Our father has indeed departed.
Well done, son of Olora, who walks majestically.

'Artistry and virtuosity is what is expected of the dancers in an ancestral masquerade when challenged by the lead drummer;
the oriki empowers the dancer to be, and the lineage members to perceive, the ancestral presence' (ibid. : 134).

Bamgboye himself clearly held the Brinkworth mask in high regard, perhaps as a measure of his artistic insight, oju-inu, having
kept it for so many years after its creation.
LOT 86

PROPERTY FROM THE RAYMOND E. BRITT FAMILY COLLECTION
A MAMBILA FIGURE

estimate 2,500—3,500 USD

MEASUREMENTS
height 16 1/4 in. 41.3cm

DESCRIPTION
standing on bent muscular legs, beneath the rounded abdomen, with outstretched arms and broad hands beneath the arched neck
and deeply carved face with bulbous features and a crested coiffure; encrusted greyish patina with areas of white and red ochre
pigment.

PROVENANCE
George Stoecklin, France, July 1976
LOT 103

A TERRACOTTA MALE FIGURE, POSSIBLY CAMEROON

estimate 5,000—7,000 USD

MEASUREMENTS
height 22 1/2 in. 57.2cm

DESCRIPTION
standing, the fragmentary base supporting the figure arched forward and wearing a tunic and holding a bowl to the front, the face with stylized
features including a beard and deeply set almond-shaped eyes and wearing a backswept coiffure; varied reddish to grey surface.

PROVENANCE
Acquired from Everett Rassiga, 1964

LITERATURE AND REFERENCES
Robbins, 1966: figure 214

CATALOGUE NOTE
This beautiful terracotta figure was acquired by Mrs. Mellon from the dealer Everett Rassiga in 1964. In her notes, Mellon lists the figure as
Cameroon. Another note in her records describes the figure as 'found in Rhodesia, thought to be Cameroon'. Shortly after its acquisition, the
work was published in Robbins well-known survey African Art in American Collections (1966).

No related terracotta figures appear in the literature on Cameroon. There is a tradition of working in terracotta in Cameroon, in the often
highly-stylized pipe bowls, see for example (Harter 1986:13, figures 142, 143). However, no large-scale figurative tradition appears as a pre-
cursor to this genre. The morphology of the face relates to those of Cameroon masks: the full cheeks and lips, the U-shaped, striated beard,
the deeply-outlined eyes and the arching, striated brows. Cameroon royalty also wear billowing robes. One can place the figure in the context
of the other refined and sensitive works of African art from Mrs. Mellon's collection, however, its exact origin remains a mystery and a point for
continued research.
LOT 108

PROPERTY FROM THE RAYMOND E. BRITT FAMILY COLLECTION
A RARE LENGOLA FIGURE

estimate 50,000—70,000 USD

MEASUREMENTS
height 60 1/2 in. 153.7cm

DESCRIPTION
ubanga nyami, of overall elongated articulated form, the lenticular legs inserted at the hips of the torso with pendant phallus
and gently flared at the center beneath the square chest with arms inserted at the sides and splayed outward with pointed
fingers, the head inserted at the top with a domed and a heart-shaped facial plane, with raised coffee-bean eyes; the whole
blackened and encrusted with large areas of kaolin.

PROVENANCE
Alvin Abrams, New York, November 1979

LITERATURE AND REFERENCES
Bradley 1982: 11, catalogue number 7, catalogue of the exhibition, Notre Dame, Indiana, The Snite Museum of Art, 1982
Robbins and Nooter 1989: 491, catalogue number 1270

CATALOGUE NOTE
Large Lengola figures of veneration, such as the Britt figure, are known as ubanga nyama. They were erected in the center of
a village after the death of a chief. These minimalist sculptures are thought to represent the Lengola’s founding ancestor,
Suway. Such figures are rare (Neyt 1981: 38) and their exact function is unknown (Biebuyck 1986:240). Biebuyck suggests the
figures allowed invocations to be made, specifically by men (1977:54). The figures can be disassembled, possibly for storage
purposes or portability, as they are used infrequently.

Typically, ubanga nyama are of elongated proportions, with a small, articulated chest above a long trunk issuing lenticular
limbs. The figures also display cruciform arms framing a concave, heart-shaped face. Most figures were painted at some time.

Stylistically, Lengola figures share formal qualities with the art of their neighbors, the Lega (Biebuyck 1986:240). The distinctive
treatment of the face, the concave heart-shaped and linear features is characteristic of both groups.

For closely related figures see Neyt (1981: 42, figure II.12); Maurer (c 1991: 97, catalogue number 81) for a figure from the
Mestach Collection, and Gillon (1979: 138, figure 169) for another from the MRAC, Baselitz (2003, figure 97). The Baselitz
figure, like the Britt figure, displays dramatic contrast with a light patina on the face and lower limbs.
LOT 110

PROPERTY FROM A EUROPEAN COLLECTION
A FINE LEGA FEMALE FIGURE

estimate 18,000—22,000 USD

MEASUREMENTS
height 8in. 20.5cm


DESCRIPTION
the angular legs tapering to the torso with protruding navel and breasts framed by truncated arms, the sloping shoulders supporting the
head with scooped, heart-shaped facial plane, notched mouth and coffee-bean eyes; varied medium brown patina with areas of kaolin.

CATALOGUE NOTE
Lega wooden figures are rare and served as part of the contents of a basket used during initiation ceremonies. As Biebuyck (2002: 119)
describes, '...the essential presentation takes place during the kunanuna masengo rite in lutumbo lwa kindi. The figurines are removed
from the baskets together with numerous other manufactured and natural objects, and they are displayed. One by one, sometimes
several in a single sequence, the sculptures are picked up by the presentors and danced wiith. For a long time these important figurines
were barely represented in world collections. They were jealously kept by the initiates as expressions of their in-group spirit, as major
links with the deceased predecessors and as a profound expression of ultimate values and historical interdependencies. Several of these
larger wooden figurines represent in their morphology a sort of prototypical icon where form, action and meaning conicide to some extent.'
LOT 113

A LEGA FEMALE FIGURE

estimate 5,000—8,000 USD

MEASUREMENTS
height 11 5/8 in. 29.5cm


DESCRIPTION  
iginga, standing on wedge-shaped feet, the angular legs leading to the waisted torso framed by truncated arms beneath the
spherical head with a heart-shaped facial plane; varied redish to medium brown patina.

PROVENANCE
James Willis, San Francisco, April 1978

LITERATURE AND REFERENCES
Bradley, Traditional African Sculpture from the Britt Family Collection, 1982: 9, figure 6, catalogue of the exhibition, Notre
Dame, Indiana, The Snite Museum of Art, University of Notre Dame, October 24 - December 19, 1982


CATALOGUE NOTE
See Biebuyck (1973: 160-161 and plates 67-71) for related figures. Figures created for the Lega bwami men's society
illustrate characters with either good or poor moral values. Bradley (1982: 9) suggests that the Britt figure with her fine
scarification, carefully rounded head and drawn-out lower jaw portrays a 'good' woman with positive traits.
LOT 140

PROPERTY FROM THE RAYMOND E. BRITT FAMILY COLLECTION
A RARE LWALWA PAIR OF MALE AND FEMALE FIGURES

estimate 40,000—60,000 USD

MEASUREMENTS
height of tallest 15 3/4 in. 40cm


DESCRIPTION
each of similar overall cubistic form, the wedge-shaped feet leading to bent legs, the female with knees extended, the male with inverted
knees, with a cloth band encircling the waist, the torsos framed by the pointed, pitched-forward shoulders and arms held out to the sides,
the thick necks supporting the highly stylized heads with crescent-shaped facial planes with the protruding lips beneath pointed noses
bisecting coffee-bean eyes and wearing deeply grooved backswept coiffures, the male with a hole at the crown possibly for insertion of
magic; layered deep red ochre patinas.

PROVENANCE
Alvin Abrams, New York, December 1976

LITERATURE AND REFERENCES
Bradley 1982: 12 & 13, catalogue numbers 8 & 9
Felix 1987: 95, figure 6
Robbins and Nooter 1989: 416, figures 1060 and 1061

CATALOGUE NOTE
Lwalwa figures are extremely rare. In the scant literature covering them, the facial features of these figures are often compared to those
of Lwalwa masks based on related aesthetic elements. Indeed, as Bradley (1982: 13) posits, the faces of the sculptures reflect Lwalwa
concepts of beauty. The Britt pair displays several typical mask characteristics, including the oval, slightly concave face, elongated
rectangular eyes, projecting rectangular mouth, pointed chin, and an elaborate coiffure marked by a central ridge.

Compare the stance of the Britt pair— showing characteristic bent arms, hands placed on the stomach, and bent knees— with a female
figure displaying related features (Timmermans 1967: 89, figure 18A & B). For another figure, which is thought to have been a staff finial
formerly in the Bronson collection, see Cornet (1978: 183, catalogue number 99).

Lwalwa statuary is uncommon, but pairs are even more rare. According to Felix there are only three known pairs in existence (personal
communication). Felix notes that the Lwalwa, as with other peoples of the region, such as the Dinga, always carved figures in pairs.
Where single figures are known independently, they are female. These single figures, which Timmermanns suggest were used in women’s
fertility rights, may well have been part of a couple at some point in their history.


Pairs, even if they do not correspond exactly, were not intended as portraits, but rather as representations of the mythical ancestors —
the originators of the Lwalwa. These figures would have been venerated in dedicated shrines. The practice of creating figures in pairs
parallels the masking tradition amongst the Lwalwa. While almost exclusively found in the West as individual masks, the masks were
originally carved as male and female pairs.
Jean and Raymond Britt - 1997
Quite a few items in the catalog were from the estate of Raymond Britt and below is the write up in the catalog about the collection.

"THE OBJECTS WHICH I COLLECTED ARE THOSE I ENCOUNTERED IN THE COURSE OF MY SEARCH TO WHICH I FELT A PERSONAL RESPONSE."
(THE REV.) RAYMOND E. BRITT, JR.

THE RAYMOND E. BRITT, JR. FAMILY COLLECTION
MORE THAN JUST ART: A FAMILY AFFAIR

It was more than just art. It was more than just history. It was more than just collecting rare pieces of African culture. It was a family affair, one that took
dramatic and important pieces of African art and brought them into the house, home and family.
Raymond Britt (1937-2004), Episcopal priest, businessman and President of a graduate school of management in Chicago, developed an immediate
and lifelong passion when his brother-in-law, Charles Edwards, introduced him to African art in 1976. This passion became a source of joy and wonder
for his whole family.

Ray was drawn to African art because it combines spiritual, ceremonial and tribal significance. As an Episcopal priest his interest drew him towards
works with Christian iconography. This part of the collection was exhibited at the Snite Museum of Notre Dame University—Christian Imagery in African
Art: The Britt Family Collection (1980). The objects offered for sale here also show his fascination with abstract art, such as those which inspired
Picasso and other early 20th century artists
The Britt Family Collection was purchased in the late 1970's on trips to Paris, Nice, New York, and Belgium, where Ray worked closely with mentors
such as Irwin Mersey and Alfie Scheinberg.The trips were family affairs, a great education in art for his four children and his wife, Jean.

Items from the Britt Family Collection of African Art have been on display at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Heard Museum and other museums. Ray
believed the art was integral to the culture from which it came, and the collection became a significant symbolic element in the lives of the Britt family
and friends. The art was a passion, present in every room of the house. Each family member had their own appreciation: Rett, a hockey-playing
teenager, kept a Bobo Fing mask looking like a precursor to the modern hockey goalie mask, in his room. Melissa remembers celebrating New Year's
Eve with the often-photographed and published Lwalwa pair, decorated with party hats. Sarah, who became an International citizen, chose the Pende
mask from the Kat White collection as her favorite. Stephanie was only 10 years old when Herb Baker gave her a Dogon horse ring in recognition of her
precocious knowledge of tribal characteristics. Jean loved and appreciated the Baule works, with her background in French literature and culture.

While Ray loved living with African art, he also made many substantial gifts to museums across the country including: The Art Institute of Chicago, The
Heard Museum in Phoenix and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

At the time of his unexpected passing in October 2004, he was honoring his vocation by serving congregations and not-for-profit agencies on Chicago's
North Shore. In all his interactions with the people he served, he embodied an intense spirituality that conveyed his humility, his sense of humor, and his
search for truth. It is with great pleasure that we present The Britt Family Collection at auction. We hope, as Ray did, that the works will enrich the lives
of other African art lovers.
The Britt Family, September 2005
Rand African Art
home page